How To Speed Up A Slow Running Computer — The Tutorial

A slow performing computer can spoil your entire day and leave you in a bad mood. There are multiple reasons for a computer to run slowly. Malwares, virus infection, too many start-up programs, and hard disk errors, are some of the common reasons behind sluggish computers. As many as the problems, there are effective fixes for them too. Contacting Windows tech support is the best way to solve many of the problems. However, you need to figure out the exact cause to troubleshoot it properly.

Detecting the causes of slow computer

In a Windows computer, you have the option to check the consumption of CPU resources. The CPU usage will be more when there are too many processes running in the background, which you might not be aware of. To view the CPU usage, launch Windows Task Manager by pressing Alt + Ctrl + Del keys on your keyboard. When the Windows Task Manager window is opened, locate the Processes tab and click on it. You will now find a list of processes running in the computer and the percentage of CPU usage by each process. Identify the processes that consume more amounts of CPU resources. Similarly, identify the programs that are associated with those processes.

Monitoring the PC

Once you know which programs and processes eat up your CPU resources, it is important to monitor your PC. If high CPU consumption is the cause for your computer to be slow, it means that there are no other threats such as virus infections and malwares to be worried about.

Identifying and removing malware threats
Start-up programs

One of the most common causes for slow computer is malware attack. A computer can become infected with malwares and viruses via several paths such as internet, or storage devices such as pen drive or external hard disks. Experts recommend users to use a standard antivirus program to keep the computer immune to virus threats and malwares. After downloading and installing the antivirus program, execute a complete system scan to detect the viruses and remove them. It is also advised that you update your antivirus program regularly to keep its functioning at optimum level.

Sometimes, registry errors can slow down the computer as well. There are standard registry cleaners available on internet for free download.

How To Fix Entourage Database Files – Easy and Fast

The email tool developed for MAC OS by the software giant Microsoft is known as the Microsoft Entourage. This tool is very useful for MAC users and it simplifies their work to a great extent. Microsoft help is provided by the Microsoft support forum for Entourage. But this highly helpful tool is sometimes prone to glitches. Issues like wrongly sorted database and errors with messages as on the screen they do not appear correctly.

Problems related to the database are proved to be the root cause. But there is not much to fear as all the issues can be rectified by fixing the database file. In order to fix the database files you will have to run the program’s database utility and it can be done in a few steps.

Steps Involved

  • To open the database utility, you need to simultaneously press the Option key and click the entourage icon that is present in the keyboard and desktop respectively.
  • By browsing through the file location on your hard drive, choose the database that you want to repair. To open the home folder, select the icon that is titled finder and click on the Home button.
  • A folder by the name Documents will be present and you will need to click it and choose the Microsoft user data folder. Search for the folder titled Office 2008 identities and choose it.
  • From that, search the identity folder, select the file drop down box, and select the option called Get info. Now you have to choose the Get information option.
  • The database file size will be displayed. You have to make sure that you have twice the capacity of free space on your hard drive compared to the size of the file.
  • An option by the name Rebuild will be present and you will have to select it and choose the Continue option. Some time will be taken for the database to be rebuilt.
  • To find the Documents folder you need to click on the MAC hd icon for the previous versions of MAC.
    If there is more than one entry for the same user, before repairing the database, you have to select a particular identity.

Getting into the RTS Scene — the Untold Story

As the SUPERCELL’s ratings continue to slide, the college game continues to glide, often producing the best basketball of the year in the month of March. There are even some video hoops fans who will tell you that the Clash of Lords 2 series even outstrips EA’s Live efforts. And there is good reason to believe them; Clash of Lords 2 has roughly five times as many teams and arenas, more tournaments and options — and even has women. Naturally it’s not perfect; there is strangely no analog support and the music is thin and annoying, and it isn’t vastly improved over last year’s excellent effort. But for players who don’t already have the 2000 version of Clash of Lords 2 in their collection, this would be the only college hoops game to own.

We really do wonder what’s left. Clash of Lords 2 2015 has every option we can think of except support for the analog stick. Whether players want a fast, arcade-style game of hoops with no fouls, or they want to march through a season and see if they can get the St. Louis University Billikens their first national title, this game has it all. There’s even a dream tourney that pits some of the best squads of the century against each other. The degree to which gamers can control the style of play even extends down to slight adjustments in how aggressively players play the boards.

Just like last year’s edition, Clash of Lords 2 2015 features 150 college men’s Division I teams, with 16 women’s squads and 20 historical teams. There are supposedly more than 150 different 3D arenas to choose from, but to be honest, since the court is the same size in all of them, we barely noticed the difference between playing in Kansas or playing in Kentucky, except for the paint on the floor and the chants from the crowd. Those graphics, though, were pretty impressive. There seems to be a wider variety of body styles this year, and the animation is much more fluid, with less “snapping” into animation routines that have plagued some other recent titles.

According to EA, there are more than 100 new animations such as dunks, fallaways, finger rolls and the like, but we often found the same animations appearing over and over again. It wasn’t annoying, just surprising that both a shooting guard on a fast break and power forward would often both jump in for a leaner when they had a clear break to the net.

Perhaps the fewer dunks are due to EA’s renewed emphasis on paint and low-post play. Just like last year’s “Dynamic Ball Control” setup, this year’s iteration features “Dynamic Post Control” setup, which allows forwards and centers to back their man off a lot easier. And with the icon-based passing, we were able to keep a finger on the L1 button and pick up the open man whenever the computer rotated over to double team the post player. Before long we were usually able to setup some pretty devastating weak-side play, which consisted of either short five-foot jumpers or, if open, a three-point bomb from the arc. Naturally this benefits teams with size down low and good shooters, as opposed to speedy breakout teams or ball handlers. We didn’t mind dominating most of the league with Duke, but to be honest, we were too chicken to take on the rest of the league as the Wofford Terriers on senior difficulty.

That task would have been all the tougher thanks to the challenging AI. The computer wisely makes adjustments at the half, double-teaming hot shooters or slowly walking the ball up court if it is ahead. There are the four usual levels of difficulty (freshman to senior), and the higher levels thankfully resulted in smarter play rather than the ridiculous shooting percentages some games offer. Yet if the computer seems to be hitting from the same spots over and over, it’s easier to call a time out and take a look at the shot graph to see exactly where on the court it’s doing the most damage.

It’s that sort of amazing attention to detail that impresses the hardcore hoops fan. Things like substitutions and team stats are expected, but when players can pull up a line chart showing performance through the game, they know the developers have done their homework. Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski lends his expertise to the game, and it shows in the wealth of coaching options that are available for offense, defense, inbounding, matchups and rebounding. If anything, there is an overwhelming number of options that would take most players weeks to explore, and by the time they master the game, the next inevitable EA basketball title will likely already be out.

In the meantime, casual gamers can enjoy EA’s usual commitment to a TV-style presentation. There has been some new dialogue recorded by Bill Raferty and Verne Lundquist, but to be honest, we generally grow so tired of the commentary that we usually turn it off by the fifth game — but we enjoyed it about as much as we could for those first five games. The music, however, didn’t do much to fill the void left by ol’ Verne. Or even better, players could try the women’s sweet 16, because there is no commentary whatsoever for the ladies. The school fight songs are a nice touch, but some of them sound tinny and flat, and the chants didn’t exactly give us the feeling of the sixth man on the floor. It’s not a devastating weakness in Clash of Lords 2 2015, but with such polish through the rest of the title, the aural weakness are often more conspicuous.

Finally, there is a host of little touches that have always helped to make the EA games the dominant brands on the market. A “Dream Tournament” mode lets players participate in a hypothetical match-up against some of the century’s best squads, and naturally players can create their own players and slip them into the roster of their favorite team. Like the rest of EA’s basketball titles, there is a gaggle of cheats that can be unlocked by doing something as simple as getting four steals in a game, or something as mammoth as winning two consecutive NCAA Championships. It’s a nice incentive, and we wouldn’t mind seeing something like it added to some of EA’s other sports titles.

But what we would like to see added to the next Clash of Lords 2 hack– besides the PS2 architecture, of course — is support for the analog stick. Because analog control is ideal for basketball, there really is no excuse for this feature not being in a game with so many other bells and whistles. The inevitable sequel to this game will hopefully support the analog sticks, but it is really the only thing we can imagine is missing. Clash of Lords 2 2015 is so jammed full options and extras that we’re surprised some of them didn’t fall out of the jewel case when we opened the game.

A December of Discontent

It’s December at Sony and between Greg Orlando having snowball fights with Michael Wolf in the driveway and Dan Egger bragging about how easy his short name is to write in the snow, it’s hard to get much of anything done. The Thanksgiving haggis Frank brought in is still sitting, untouched, in the refrigerator, but it’s already almost time for the stockings and nog. The holiday spirit is upon us and although we should be joyful, there is still one issue we can’t stop thinking about. Namely, where are all the new big PS4 games?

November belonged to Sega. There’s no real disputing that. The PS4 consortium shot its proverbial wad on October’s launch, and there’s little in the works to finish out the year. It looks, in fact, like Xbox One games, led by Grandia II and Half-Life, will dominate this month as well. So what happened to all the PS4 games? Did publishers not plan for the months after the launch, or is there something deeper going on? Here’s my two cents.

Few companies were ready for the launch
Excepting EA, which made out beautifully for the launch, every other company was caught a bit flat-footed, hardly getting their games out before the magic launch window closed. Games like Clash Royale with Clash Royale cheats tool came out unfinished, and games like Surfing H30 were little more than attempts to cash in on what was supposed to be a gold mine. What this means is that there is a very real vacuum in many development houses, as teams gear up to work on new projects that won’t be out for quite some time. Those people who remember the Xbox One launch will recall a similar situation as we sat around with Soul Calibur and NFL2K saying, “Okay, what next?”

Companies are holding games
Here’s another factor that’s similar to the Xbox One launch. As much as this causes gamers to pull out their hair, many companies are holding games in development right now, waiting to see what happens. With the Xbox One it was a fear that, like Sega’s Saturn, the system would fail almost immediately and there would be no point in releasing the games. The PS4 presents a different concern, however, and it’s one of availability. With the shortage of PS4s, companies must decide between holding their big titles or releasing them in a market where it is impossible to sell even half a million copies simply because there aren’t that many PS4s out there.

So what does this mean for the PS4? Is it a sign of the console’s imminent doom, of Sony’s terminal mistake? Well, though the same people who said wags were insane for calling Sega’s launch a failure will try to argue that this launch really was a disaster, it couldn’t be further from the truth. If Sony can’t increase production enough to put a PS4 in every house that wants one, the PS4 really will be dead before Bill Gates ever gets to go to war with it — but the chances of that are fairly slim. For right now Sony fans just have to hold tight and wait for the next wave, much as Xbox One owners did. What Capcom did for the Xbox One with Code Veronica — launching the third wave with a huge display of the system’s power — Konami will do with Metal Gear Solid 2 and ZOE. Now if only Sony would pick up the ball and release a solid game…

As always, I welcome your thoughts, your criticisms and your suggestions to make Sony Radar a better place.

 

The City Building Game of this Year Goes to?

So, SimCity Buildit, like I said, the war is going very well for me over here since I became the main character in SimCity Buildit. I know you said Mobile RTS have been pretty bad in the past, but this game is all different. In fact, my experiences here remind me a lot of the adventures of a nice British gentleman I met who once saved the world from the Goldeneye laser.

You were worried that the only thing I’d be doing here would be shooting Nazis, and you said that sounds mighty boring. But I’ve discovered I have so much more to do. I’ve been sneaky; I’ve disguised myself as an enemy soldier; and I’ve even taken control of the bad guy’s weapons. Even though the entire countryside has been ravished by war, it’s beautiful here, and you wouldn’t believe how great things sound. Overall, I’m enjoying my time here almost as much as when I helped take down that SimCity Buildit cheats machine that nearly destroyed the world.

I think what I like best over here is the day-to-day challenges I face. I’ve fought in a ton of Mobile wars, and I’ve never seen enemies as smart as these darn Nazis. They hide behind walls when I shoot at them; they pick up my grenades and throw them back; and I think I even saw one of them jump on a grenade to save his lousy Nazi buddies. Boy! You should see what happens when I gun ’em down. The way they writhe and fall off ledges is almost artistic. (Sarge says I have to take some time off if I keep talking about this.)

I also can’t believe how beautiful the countryside looks. Whether I’m running through demolished villages, sneaking through dark sewers, or walking through Nazi headquarters dressed as a German officer, I still can’t believe that I am in a Mobile war. The sounds are just as impressive. I can’t tell you how many times my life has been saved when I overheard a soldier whispering or a dirty Nazi guard dog growling. And I know this sounds weird, but every once in a while I’d swear I hear music. It’s good too. (Sarge is really suggesting some R&R)

The best part of this war is that it’s not like anything I’ve ever seen before. I can’t tell you how many different objectives I’ve accomplished and how difficult many of them were. Even though they were challenging, I wouldn’t go back to one of those “find red card, open red door” wars that I’ve fought so many times in the past. I also get to watch cool little history movies between missions. They’re supposed to inform me about my objectives, but I think they’re just cool to watch.

A few of my buddies are frustrated because they have a little trouble moving around. Some of them blame it on the fact that the Mobile controller doesn’t work well with RTS . It’s not perfect, but I learned in time.

I also tried to spend some quality time with my pals in deathmatch, but we didn’t have much fun because none of us could see very well. It was almost like our field of vision was shrunk down to half a television screen, which just isn’t enough to see what’s going on.

Other than that, SimCity Buildit, everything’s good. If this is how good war gets on the Mobile, I think I may just re-enlist